longenecker webFr. Dwight Longenecker was brought up in an Evangelical home in Pennsylvania. After graduating from the fundamentalist Bob Jones University with a degree in Speech and English, he went to study theology at Oxford University. He was eventually ordained as an Anglican priest and served as a curate, a school chaplain in Cambridge and a country parson on the Isle of Wight.

Realizing that he and the Anglican Church were on divergent paths, in 1995 Fr. Dwight and his family were received into the Catholic Church. His first book is the best-selling book of English conversion stories called The Path to Rome– Modern Journeys to the Catholic Faith. He has written Listen My Son—a daily Benedictine devotional book which applies the Rule of St Benedict to the task of modern parenting. St Benedict and St Thérèse is a study of the lives and thought of two of the most popular saints. In the field of Catholic apologetics, Fr. Dwight wrote Challenging Catholics, More Christianity, The Quest for the Creed, and Christianity Pure & Simple.

Fr. Dwight has also published How to Be an Ordinary Hero and Praying the Rosary for Inner Healing. He has written a popular book for Lent in the tradition of Screwtape Letters called The Gargoyle Code – and its sequel Slubgrip Instructs. His latest book, The Romance of Religion is published by Thomas Nelson.

Fr. Dwight’s blog, Standing on My Head is published at Patheos.; He also writes for Catholic Online, Integrated Catholic Life, Intercollegiate Review, The Imaginative Conservative, The Catholic Thing, and Aleteia. He is also a regular columnist for The National Catholic Register.

In December 2006 he was ordained as a Catholic priest under the special pastoral provision for married former Anglican clergy. He now serves as parish priest of Our Lady of the Rosary parish in Greenville, and enjoys movies, blogging, books, riding his motorcycle and visiting Benedictine monasteries. He and his wife Alison have four children, named Benedict, Madeleine, Theodore and Elias.
Mr. Dale Ahlquist is the president of the American Chesterton Society, and has given talks on Chesterton that have delighted audiences around the country and around the world. Mr. Ahlquist has spoken at Yale, Columbia, NYU, Penn State, Villanova, the University of Georgia, the University of Tulsa, the University of Iowa, and many other colleges. He has given talks in England, Australia, Switzerland, and Canada.

Mr. Ahlquist is the author of G.K. Chesterton – The Apostle of Common Sense and Common Sense 101: Lessons from G.K. Chesterton. He is also creator and host of the popular “Apostle of Common Sense” television series on EWTN.
Ken DavisonMr. Kenneth Davison was a Distinguished Graduate of the United States Air Force Academy. He was a Rhodes Scholar and earned a Master of Arts from Oxford University and a Master in Theological Studies from Ave Maria University.

During his business career, Ken has been an Air Force Officer, a brand manager at Procter & Gamble, a marketing and business development executive for several public and private companies, Vice President of College Relations for Belmont Abbey College, the creator several radio programs including “Glory Stories” and “The One-Minute Monk.” He continues to do business consulting.


Ken Davison is the co-founder with Patrick Madrid of The Envoy Institute, a nationwide outreach teaching Catholics to better understand, defend and share their faith, for which he currently serves as Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer. He is also the founder and President of Holy Heroes (www.HolyHeroes.com) which provides fun and catechetical products to help parents “bring the joy of the Faith to their families.”

Ken speaks at Catholic conferences about family life issues, especially about the role of a father and husband in leading and developing his children’s Catholic Faith and nurturing a Christian imagination in today’s toxic culture. His writings have appeared in numerous publications including the Knights of Columbus online magazine, Fathers for Good, This Rock, Homiletic and Pastoral Review, and others.

Living in North Carolina with his wife Kerri, Ken is a proud homeschooling father of eight children.
Missy webMrs. Melissa Savage is a wife to Jerome of almost 19 years and the mother of 6, ranging from the age of 13 to 2.

The Savages began homeschooling after realizing the public school system would not work for their oldest, Thomas. Melissa was reluctant to homeschool because she thought she lacked what it would take to accomplish the task. As it turns out, God has given her what she needed at every stage.

Each one of her children has unique needs and she is a very effective force in their education. She has become very proficient in keeping several balls in the air all at the same time, but she would be the first to tell you that she doesn’t see it that way.

Melissa and Jerome have an inspiring dedication to The Catholic Church and are involved in many ministries.
Mrs. Virginia (Ginny) Seuffert, a native New Yorker and mother of 12, has been homeschooling for over 20 years! While in New York, Mrs. Seuffert lectured, debated, and wrote a number of articles for the Pro-Life movement. After moving to Illinois, she became a founding member of the Network of Illinois Catholic Home Educators, helped establish the “Round Table” (a Catholic home school leadership discussion group), and became a founder and officer of the Catholic Home School Network of America.

In addition to appearing on EWTN, she has been a guest on numerous radio shows, lectured at Catholic family conferences all over the United States and Canada, and has authored several articles on such topics as home education, teaching children the virtues, and household management. The Illinois Press Association awarded her first place honors for a column she wrote defending traditional family values in a local newspaper. Seton Magazine regularly features her columns, and she has three published books, Ginny’s Gems: Home Management Essentials, Ginny’s Gems: 10 Essentials for Teaching Your Preschooler at Home, and It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way.